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Juvenile Justice

  • Hastings measure to give Illinois’ children a second chance signed into law

    hastings 011017TINLEY PARK- The Illinois Juvenile Justice Commission found that between 2004 and 2014, only 0.26 percent of juvenile arrests in Illinois were expunged, and 87 percent of counties granted an average of less than one juvenile expungement per year.

    To tackle this issue, State Senator Michael E. Hastings’ measure House Bill 3817 to combat unlawful and overly broad sharing of juvenile records in Illinois was signed into law today.

    “This is a step in the right direction. We need to be working toward rehabilitating children caught in our court system to give them a chance to succeed, not crippling them with the mistakes of their past,” Hastings said. “This change will result in an infinite number of positive outcomes for our state’s young people.” 

  • Mulroe: decrease re-arrests by reducing juvenile custody time

    mulroe 031617SPRINGFIELD – Senate Bill 1799 introduced by State Senator John G. Mulroe (D-Chicago) seeks to reduce the time juveniles are kept in custody upon arrest to, in turn, decrease the likeliness that a juvenile will be re-arrested later in life. SB 1799 requires juveniles to appear before a judicial officer within 48 hours of being taken into custody, regardless of weekends and court holidays.

    “Studies have shown that reducing the amount of time that a juvenile spends in custody will decrease the likeliness that that individual will be arrested again and their likeliness of joining the adult prison population,” Mulroe said. “This is a common sense piece of legislation.”

    Under current law, a minor must appear before a judicial officer within 40 hours of detainment, not including weekends or court holidays. To help facilitate the change of including weekends and court holidays, the minor may appear through two way audio-visual communication.

    “While working as an assistant state’s attorney, I saw defendants with criminal records extending back to when they were teenagers,” Mulroe said. “Plenty of crime occurs by repeat offenders. This legislation is another approach to curb the rates of re-arrest.”

  • Raoul: New criminal justice reform laws build on data-driven, commonsense approaches

    Sen RaoulSPRINGFIELD — State Senator Kwame Raoul (D-Chicago 13th) lauded  the signing of several criminal justice reform measures he sponsored this year as part of a larger push for commonsense, data-driven approaches to law enforcement, sentencing, incarceration and the reintegration of ex-offenders.

    “Illinois is again pushing forward as a pioneer of criminal justice reform – because it saves money, because it saves lives and communities and because it’s the right thing to do,” Raoul said. “These new laws on juvenile justice, expungement, access to licensed professions and sex offender registration policies will help bring the realities of criminal justice in line with its aims of genuine public safety and lasting rehabilitation.”

  • Sen. Van Pelt argues for Juvenile Miranda rights

    Senator Patricia Van Pelt (D-Chicago) argues the value of allowing juveniles the right to be read and explained their Miranda rights.


  • Van Pelt advances plan to protect children during police interrogations

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